What should I do if I'm not happy with my career choice?

Joan Isaac MohrJoan Isaac Mohr
Vice President and Dean of Admissions

Quinnipiac University
When educators talk about "lifelong learning," this is exactly what we mean! If you want a second bachelor's degree, at least you'll likely have completed some of the basic core curriculum course work through your previous degree. Get a transcript of your course work sent to you so that as you speak with other admission offices; you can fax them a copy of your grades and they can tell you how many credits it will take you to complete a degree in whichever area you choose. Now, how you decide which area—that may be the harder part. Let's say your goal is to teach English (which would allow you to take courses in creative writing and education). You need to find out what degree teachers in your state need—is a bachelor's sufficient? Will you need a master's degree? You may be able, with your bachelor's in hand, to take some English courses in order to be certified in English, and then enter a master's program in education, which may be a lot shorter than getting a second bachelor's degree. Most states certify teachers who get a master's in education (you'll need a few prerequisites such as Educational Psychology and Educational Theory), but I'd recommend finding a college with a master's degree in secondary education. Call them and tell them what you want to do!

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