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Financial Aid Application Mistakes Can Cost You

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Senior Vice President for Enrollment Services, Union University

The financial aid application process can get a little hairy--there are a number of forms involved, multiple deadlines to meet, and important details to include. It's easy for little mistakes to occur, and those errors can sometimes be quite costly, in the most literal sense of the word! Luckily, a carefull review of your applications and a good system of organization can help you avoid those application mistakes. And don't forget: the admission and financial aid offices at the colleges and universities you are considering are there to help you in this process, so don't hesitate to call or e-mail them with your questions! 

Missing deadlines

Everyone hates deadlines, but pushing or ignoring financial aid deadlines can be costly. If you are filling out multiple aid applications, it’s also possible to confuse one deadline with another. As you begin each application, make it a point to keep the deadline prominently displayed. (Try using a sticky note so it is always the first thing you see on the application.) The most important deadline is for the FAFSA. Without that form on file, you become ineligible for most financial aid. Also, many sites have filing deadlines for state aid eligibility.

Waiting too long to start the process

If you fail to allow adequate time to research scholarships and complete lengthy application forms, you are more likely to make hasty mistakes and miss sources of funding that could make a difference. Find out what can be done prior to making your college choice and complete those steps as early as possible. For example, you can submit FAFSA beginning January 1 and change it later in the year. Once your college selection is made, become familiar with institutional scholarship offers and the deadlines for making applications.

Underestimating the available resources

Every year, some grants and scholarships go unused. The reason: an absence of qualified applicants. Many prospective college students and their parents are quite surprised by the amount of help that is available, but unfortunately some never make this pleasant discovery. Find and apply for opportunities that fit your needs and qualifications. Never assume the competition will be too difficult or the resources too limited.

Paying to submit FAFSA

Be careful using search engines to access the online FAFSA form. You should only use the online form at the federal website www.fafsa.ed.gov. It’s possible to think you are on a federal website when in fact it is a private business that is presenting the form—a private business that will charge you a fee for submitting the finished product. It’s a free application, after all! You should never pay to submit a completed FAFSA form, nor should you ever pay for assistance in completing the form. Free online help is available.

Failing to answer every question on forms

For some questions on forms like the FAFSA, the correct response will be zero. Be sure to enter a zero rather than simply leaving the space blank. Such blank spaces can result in a rejected form and delays.

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