Summer Break Can Be a Springboard to Your Future

by
Senior Editor, Porter Sargent Handbooks

Mar   2013

Fri

15

Ah, summertime! Nothing like it, right? Time to put the homework and books aside for a while and enjoy yourself with lots of sunshine and time for friends. If you’re lucky, maybe some summer romance comes your way.

Okay, so you may have to go on one of those family “vacations” to spend some quality time with your crazy Uncle Alvin. Oh, and that summer job of yours is good for some pocket money, but stocking shelves at your local convenience store gets a bit old after four or five weeks.

Looking to the future

If you want your future profession to be a bit more stimulating than your summer jobs have been, why not use part of your summer to further explore an area of personal interest? There’s a wide world of opportunity awaiting you at summer programs around the country.

Summer Break Can Be a Springboard to Your FutureThink about it: instead of being required to study certain subjects as you are during the school year to meet curricular requirements, you’re able to choose your own path for summer study. Maybe you’re lagging behind your classmates a bit in math or you’d like to brush up on your writing skills. If so, you’re in luck: there are numerous programs available to help you improve your abilities in these—and many other—areas.

If you don’t have any real need to brush up on skills, you’re really in good shape. This is your chance to further explore a passion—or to check out an area that you’re not very familiar with, but have always been curious about. You’re probably getting a feel for your academic talents through your success (or lack thereof) in various subjects at school. This is important, of course—if you want to have a successful career after college, you’ll have to be good at what you do.

Passion is no ordinary word

Don’t underestimate the need to feel passionate about your future career, however. Like it or not, you’ll probably be spending more of your waking hours at work than you will with your family. Do you want your job to be a grind—even if you’re good at it—or do you want to look forward to getting up and going to work every day? Yeah, I thought so.

The very best way to ensure that you have a fulfilling career is to follow one of your passions. While it’s important to keep practicality in mind when choosing a career path, it’s even more essential to your future happiness that you find a way to make a living doing something that you love.

Use Summer Program Search to find a program that suits your interests. The site’s search tool allows you to narrow your findings by program focus or keyword, so you’ll quickly find yourself with a nice selection of appealing options.

It’s a great benefit to be able to try things out during your high school summer breaks. With the explosion of specialized summer programming over the past decade or so, you have a unique opportunity to really make your summer count. And since we’re not talking about a six- or eight-week program (in all likelihood), you can check out an area of potential interest for a week or two and still have plenty of summer left for earning money, relaxing with friends, and, yes, even visiting crazy Uncle Alvin.

 

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About Dan McKeever

Dan McKeever

Dan McKeever, Porter Sargent Handbooks’ veteran senior editor, has worked with a lifetime of details during a tenure that has lasted nearly a quarter of a century. Over the years, he has witnessed quite a few changes in the world of summer programs through his work on the Guide to Summer Programs (which was first published as the Guide to Summer Camps and Summer Schools way back in 1924). Many of today’s cool summer programs didn’t exist back when Dan was growing up, so he filled his summers with retail jobs and fun along Boston’s South Shore. Away from the office, Dan is a big fan of hockey, independent films, good chocolate (the darker the better), and album rock (the more obscure the better). 

 
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