The Obama Administration Advises Colleges to Consider Race in Admission

Magazine Journalism Major, Boston University

Aug   2012



A recent article in The Washington Post released the president’s opinion on college affirmative action. After reading this article, I have a newfound interest for the Fisher vs. University of Texas Supreme Court case and undeniably a new opinion on college affirmative action admission.

A Caucasian female, Abigail Fisher, believes that her rejection to the University of Texas at Austin was because she is white. Due to her rejection to the University, Fisher believes that her constitutional rights were hindered. She is confident that less-qualified minorities were accepted, while she was not. This is the Fisher vs. University of Texas case that was addressed previously on CollegeXpress.

In 2003, the Supreme Court introduced college affirmative action admission to better diversify public universities around the country. The Supreme Court said this was in the interest of public universities.

According to an article in The Washington Post, the Obama Administration advocates that universities take race into account when accepting applicants. The Obama Administration states that in today’s world, the government wants to pick its leaders from a diverse and well-rounded group of graduates. The administration believes that the leaders of the United States must have a clear understanding of diversity to successfully govern and defend our country.

The Obama Administration supports the University of Texas in the Fisher vs. University of Texas case. Nine years ago, the Supreme Court stated that an applicant to a university could not simply be boosted by his or her race; however, when looking at an applicant as a whole, race could be considered as one factor. If the Supreme Court were to renounce its interest in college diversity, then many public colleges and universities, such as the University of Texas, would likely have an increase in Caucasian and Asian students, and would instantly have less Hispanic, African American, and other minority students.

It is commonly thought that applicants who belong to a minority race will have a leg up during the admission process. Many colleges and universities consider race in their admission process. According to an article in The Washington Post, if a college or university is deciding between a Caucasian student and an African American student who have identical test scores and GPAs, the college will most likely pick the African American student. Institutions strive to achieve an extremely diverse student body because diversity leads to acceptance and change, providing equality in education. Diversity leads to tolerance on a college campus, which then leads to that same attitude beyond just the classroom, but in the world around us.

Now that the Obama Administration has voiced its opinion about college affirmative action and the Fisher vs. University of Texas case, perhaps the prolonged case will soon be drawn to a close. What are your thoughts on the case? Leave your opinion in the comments below!

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About Sarah Anolik

Sarah Anolik

Sarah Anolik is a junior at Boston University, studying in the College of Communication. She is majoring in magazine journalism, minoring in psychology, and aspires to write for a magazine or newspaper someday (more specifically, ELLE magazine in New York City!). She was born and raised in Rochester, New York, but is a true Boston sports fan! Sarah is involved in BU’s school newspaper, The Daily Free Press, as a staff photographer. Additionally, she was elected to be her Greek organization’s Historian, the appointed photographer. Aside from photography, Sarah enjoys writing, shopping, and exercising.