One-on-One with Lindsey Liberatore--Theatre Major

Assistant Editor

Oct   2011



Lindsey Liberatore is originally from Lakeville, Massachusetts and attended Marymount Manhattan College in New York City—a liberal arts college mostly known for its theatre and dance programs. Lindsey fell in love with acting after she took part in a production of “Annie” at summer camp one year. Because of her passion, her parents took her to see more shows and she was hooked instantly. Aspiring to become an actress, Lindsey decided to major in acting and graduated with her B.F.A. in 2006. Lindsey is now entering her second year at the ART/MXAT Institute for Advanced Theater Training at Harvard University. She recently returned from three months of training at Moscow Art Theatre in Russia.

Interested in hearing more? Read a Q&A with Lindsey:

What was your intention/goal for the future as a theatre major?

I wanted to work on stage and be a part of a theatre company in order to perform in the kind of work that I was interested in. I was fortunate enough to get involved with Enthuse Theatre with a fellow graduate who is currently getting her M.F.A. in Directing from Columbia University.

What types of classes were required for your theatre major?

A wide variety of classes—movement, voice and speech, and acting are the core classes of the curriculum. However, these courses include a wide variety of techniques. You will be exposed to several acting techniques, from Meisner to Stanislavski. Other courses include: Acting for the Camera, Audition Techniques, Directing and Solo Performance, just to name a few.

What made you choose a university over a performing arts school?

It was, and still is, my belief that a well-rounded education will make you a better actor. MMC is a liberal arts college, so along with rigorous voice and speech, movement, and acting classes, I was exposed to classes such as Bioethics and Film Studies that enriched my understanding of the world, and therefore my chosen profession. Research is an integral part of being an intelligent actor. Challenging yourself in other aspects of your education will only increase your understanding and appreciation of the stories that you tell as a performer.

Did you ever perform on campus? Off campus?

Yes, I performed in three Mainstage shows and a number of student directed projects. From my sophomore year on, I was performing at the school on a regular basis. I did not perform off campus while in school, but did so immediately after graduating.

How often did you rehearse while at school?

Rehearsals are rigorous. You should be prepared to rehearse for acting classes on a daily basis. Rehearsal for Mainstage shows can be a month long intensive process. In addition, all of your classes will include individual performances and/or projects that will also require rehearsal time. It’s a lot, but with crafty and mindful scheduling, it’s a lot of fun.

What are your plans for the real world?

After graduate school, I plan to return to NYC. I was lucky enough to be freelancing with a top commercial agent before I went to school, and it’s my hope that following a successful showcase (Cambridge, LA, and NYC) that more doors will open. It is still my goal to work on stage, regionally and in New York.

Do you have any advice for aspiring actors?

Make sure that you find a working actor that you aspire to be like. A working actor is much different than a celebrity! Working actors are fortunate enough to make a living at what they love to do, but they are not stars. They often tour and perform in regional theatres; it’s a lot of work! Also, identify your interests other than acting/theatre/musical theatre. Your uniqueness is what will make you an intriguing actor. So find the things that make you, you and embrace them!

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About Victoria Scibilia

Victoria Scibilia

Victoria Scibilia is a contributing editor for Carnegie Communications.