Jun   2017

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Attending College With a Mental Illness

by
CollegeXpress Student Writer
Last Updated: Oct 26, 2020

There are a few steps you need to take when you’re getting ready to go to your future college. But when you’re living with a mental illness, it’s so critical to take steps to make college a little less stressful than it already is. The tips below will make moving onto campus easier for students living with mental illnesses such as depression, anxiety, and more. Just keep in mind that they’re for students who have already chosen their college—searching for colleges that can help you with your mental illness is a whole different story! (Please remember that this advice is not a substitute for talking to your doctor or another mental health professional.) Check out these tips for coping with mental illnesses in college

Speak with your doctor and/or therapist

Your pediatrician or any mental health professional you are seeing can be a great first step for figuring out how to get ready for college. They can suggest exercises and coping mechanism that will help you, and they can walk you through some of the challenges you might face. Also, if you think you’ll need special accommodations in college, like getting extra time on tests, you’ll need a note from your doctor (by the way, there are a ton of helpful links in that article too). That way the college can make those accommodations for you—more on that in the next section.

Plan your own campus preview day

Talk to your parents and/or admission counselor about planning your own campus preview day, kind of like any other campus visit but done on your own terms and including a visit to the college’s counseling and health services center. This way you can talk face to face with the people who will be there to work with you when you arrive on campus in the fall and start to mentally prepare for your transition to college. These mental health professionals can sit down with you and walk through the kind of opportunities they can offer you. For example, some colleges offer students with anxiety separate testing spaces. Or students with ADHD can get preferential seating, so they’re in areas of the classroom that can be less distracting. Students might also be able to get regular counseling on campus. Just ask about what’s available to you, because these resources can change depending on the campus.

Related: Campus Visits: Solo Edition

Report it on your housing application and medical records

In college, you can get help when you need it without disclosing any mental health issues—so never be afraid to go to the campus health and wellness center and ask for help if you need it. But being honest on your records can help the college lead you in the right direction of certain steps they may want you to take. The college will see your records and may ask you to file for disability in their health services department.

More help for incoming college students living with mental illness

Make sure when you get to college you utilize the resources they offer! Here are five campus resources to know about

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About Emily Barylske

Emily Barylske

First things first: I'm on the hunt currently to pay for my college in free money, and I'm a huge supporter of getting all of the college scholarships you can before taking out student loans. I love taking photos, reading, and writing in my free time. I am currently involved in school clubs such as FCA, choir, and yearbook. I hope to help you and encourage you in your college and scholarship search process.

 

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