White blonde student thinking next to chalkboard with school-related doodles

Advanced Placement Test Scores: How Will They Affect Your College Admission?

When AP test scores are released, you may be a little confused wondering how the numbers you receive will impact your college future. Well, this is how!

For rising seniors, college applications and acceptances are never far away. No matter which school you're aiming for, everyone wants to secure their future and make sure their hard work in high school pays off. With the release of AP test scores earlier this month, you might be wondering how the number on your report will impact your college future. It's important to understand your score and its impact on your student profile before hitting the “send score report” button to your dream school.

Understanding your AP test scores

Perhaps one of the most confusing aspects of standardized testing is simply understanding your score. Is it good? Is it good enough? And with AP scores, is it good enough to earn those sweet, sweet (money-saving) college credits? AP scores range from 1–5, with a 3 usually counting as a “passing” score. According to the College Board (which administers the test), the AP scoring scale means:

  • 5 = Extremely well qualified
  • 4 = Well qualified 
  • 3 = Qualified 
  • 2 = Possibly qualified 
  • 1 = No recommendation

A 3 also typically equates to a score of 60%, a 4 is 70%, and a 5 is 85% or higher. If you get a 3, 4, or 5, you will almost certainly be able to find a college that offers credit for your score. However, your chances of getting college credit for your AP score are much higher if you get a 4 or 5. Even if your score is a 1 or 2, all is not lost. If you would like to try to earn credit, you can retake the test next year! Additionally, just because you passed with a 3 doesn't necessarily mean you'll be getting credit for your score. Moderately to highly selective schools often require a 5 to test out of intro classes, while less selective schools are more likely to award credits for a lower score.

Related: What to Do While You Wait for Your AP Test Scores

AP tests and your college choices

First things first: Although every college's admission policy is different, most US schools won’t use your AP scores in their admission decision. (However, if you’re thinking about applying to a college in the United Kingdom, many schools require scores of 4 or 5 on anywhere from two to eight AP tests!) With that being said, colleges are always on the hunt for bright, motivated students. Having the initiative and drive to take challenging, high-level classes like AP courses makes you a more desirable candidate for any college community. So although colleges may not consider your AP scores, they will probably appreciate the fact that you took AP courses.

AP tests can be helpful in your college search in other ways too. While you might not be decided on your major (and that's okay!), taking AP courses in an area that interests you can also benefit you in the long run. For instance, if you think you might like to major in Business, you could take AP Microeconomics or Computer Science Principles. Or if you think you want to go into medicine, AP Biology and Chemistry certainly won't hurt.

Don't let disappointment hold you back

If the little number on your AP score report was a dreaded 1 or 2, you might be wondering about your college options. First, it is important to remember that one test score doesn't define you or your accomplishments up to this point. Colleges will see that you challenged yourself and in the end, that will pay off. However, if you’re really concerned about one or more of your AP test scores, the College Board offers a score withholding option for $10 per test per school. (You can learn more about this and other score reporting options on their website.) If you choose this, colleges will see only the scores you wish them to see and have no indication that you ever took the test you're hiding. Just be aware that this option can get pricey and should be kept as a last resort.

Related: Put the A in AP Classes With These 5 Simple Academic Tips

Understanding your AP test scores is crucial for making informed decisions about your academic future. While a score of 3 is often considered passing, securing college credit is usually more attainable with a 4 or 5. Nevertheless, even lower scores shouldn't deter you, as most colleges value the effort and commitment shown by students who take on challenging AP courses. Ultimately, your AP scores, whether high or low, are just one part of your holistic college application, and they don't define your potential for success.

Explore all the Advanced Placement articles and expert advice we have on CollegeXpress with the "AP tests" tag.

Like what you’re reading?

Join the CollegeXpress community! Create a free account and we’ll notify you about new articles, scholarship deadlines, and more.

Join Now

Tags:

About Sophia Skwarchuk

Sophia Skwarchuk is a junior at Flathead High School in Kalispell, Montana. She is an active participant in Lincoln-Douglas Debate, Model United Nations, track, and cross-country. She is Vice President of her school's National Honor Society chapter and volunteers weekly for Big Brothers Big Sisters. When she isn't busy pursuing her academic studies and extracurricular interests, she enjoys dabbling in the culinary arts and writing short stories.

 

Join our community of
over 5 million students!

CollegeXpress has everything you need to simplify your college search, get connected to schools, and find your perfect fit.

Join CollegeXpress
Heaven Johnson

Heaven Johnson

Back to School Scholarship Winner, High School Class of 2023

I’d like to thank everyone on the CollegeXpress team for their generosity. Not only have I been awarded this scholarship, but CollegeXpress makes it easier to apply and gives amazing tips for schools and scholarships. I am extremely grateful as this will help with my schooling and allow me to be able to enter into the field I’ve been dreaming of all my life. 

Lexie Knutson

Lexie Knutson

High School Class of 2021

This whole website has helped me overcome the attitude I had before. I was scared to even approach the thought of college because it was so much. I knew it wasn’t just a few easy steps, and I panicked mostly, instead of actually trying. Without realizing it, CollegeXpress did exactly what I usually do when I panic, which is take it one step at a time. With college I forget that because it’s more than just a small to-do list, but this website was really helpful and overall amazing. So thank you!

Katie

Katie

High School Class of 2019

My favorite feature of CollegeXpress is the scholarship search. As someone going out of state for college, I needed all the financial help I could get, and CollegeXpress helped me easily find scholarships I could apply for to help fund my education.

Jasmine

Jasmine

High School Class of 2021

CollegeXpress helped me find the school I am currently attending by consistently sending me emails of other schools. This allowed me to do research on other schools as well as the one I am in now!

Monica

Monica

High School Class of 2023

Being a sophomore in high school, I never really worried about college. I thought it wasn't important to worry about until senior year. Through this program opportunity I came across, I realized how important it is to start looking at colleges early and start planning ahead. CollegeXpress has opened my eyes to what colleges require, what colleges are near me, and what they offer. The daily emails I get from CollegeXpress really help me look at the different options I have and what colleges I fit into. Without this website, I would not be taking the time out of my day to worry about what my future will be nor what opportunities I have. I could not be more grateful for such an amazing and useful website. It's thanks to CollegeXpress that not only me but my family now know how much potential I have in to getting into these colleges/universities that we thought were out of my reach.

College Matches
X

Colleges You May Be Interested In

Stevenson University

Stevenson, MD

Kean University

Union, NJ

Allegheny College

Meadville, PA