Oct   2018

Mon

01

5 Things Parents Need to Know About the FAFSA

by
Founder, Moon Prep

College is a huge investment for many families, and most need a little bit of financial help to make it happen. If you’re looking for ways to pay for college, one of the first resources you may turn to is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Every student qualifies for some form of student aid, so make sure you’re not skipping this step during the application process.

Over the past couple of decades, the Department of Education has streamlined the financial aid application process, but questions can still arise. If you or your child are applying to college, here are five essential things you need to know about the FAFSA.

Related: Counting Down the 15 Worst FAFSA Mistakes

1. What is the FAFSA?

The FAFSA is an annual form filled out by current and prospective college students in the United States to determine their eligibility for student aid. It can be filled out by undergraduate and graduate students. The FAFSA can determine your eligibility for grants such as the Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEC), federal work-study programs, loans, and scholarships.

2. What information does the FAFSA provide you?

After you file, the FAFSA provides you with two critical pieces of information. The first is your Expected Family Contribution (EFC), which is an index number a college’s financial aid department uses to determine how much financial aid a student would receive if they attend that particular school. The information you report on the FAFSA is used to calculate the EFC. The EFC is then calculated according to a formula established by law.

The second piece of information is the Cost of Attendance (COA), which is the amount it will cost a student to go to a school. Most colleges and universities will calculate a student’s COA to show the total costs of attending their institution. Typically, the COA is an estimate of tuition and fees, room and board, books, supplies, transportation, loan fees, miscellaneous expenses, child care, disability, or any reasonable costs for study abroad programs.

3. Does everyone need to complete the FAFSA?

It’s not a requirement, but the short answer is, yes, you should. By not filling out the FAFSA, you’re missing out on a good deal provided by the US Department of Education. Students could be eligible for federal and state grants that do not to be repaid. Or they could be eligible for low-interest student loans and work-study programs, helping them fund their education and build their résumés. Every student qualifies for some form of student aid, and the form is free to complete, so it’s definitely worth filing.

4. How do I complete the FAFSA?

The FAFSA is available at fafsa.ed.gov. Students will need their social security number, alien registration number (for non-US citizens), federal income tax returns, W-2s, and other records of money earned. These include bank statements and investment records, untaxed income records, and both the student and parent’s FSA IDs to sign the document electronically.

Related: How to Fill Out the FAFSA, Step-by-Step

5. What is the deadline?

The deadline for completing the FAFSA is June 30. But the application opens on October 1, and you should complete it as soon as possible, as many grants and scholarships are on a first-come, first-served basis. Most schools have funds that are limited, so students have a better chance of receiving those funds (if eligible) when their FAFSA is submitted early.

Related: The Best FAFSA Advice and Resources

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About Kristen Moon

Kristen Moon is an independent college counselor and founder of MoonPrep.com. Moon Prep provides one-on-one tutoring services catered to university admission. They guide students through the entire application process, including completing applications, personal statements, supplemental essays, student résumés, scholarships, and financial aid. Their specialty lies in the Ivy League, direct medical programs (BS/MD), and highly competitive universities.

 
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