Jul   2019

Mon

15

Early College: Not Your Average High School Experience

by
CollegeXpress Student Writer

You just finished middle school and can’t wait to start high school. What if I told you there was a way for you to do high school and college at the same time? It may sound like a lot of homework, but there is a program you can benefit from: Early College.

I attend Franklin County Early College High School in Louisburg, North Carolina. Early College is a five-year program that allows students to take high school and college courses. Graduates receive a high school diploma and an associate degree and/or college transfer credits from a community college. This public school program allows students to get a head start on college coursework and learn how to apply themselves at the university level. Students who attend this school are treated as adults, from the workload to the discipline.

I’m in my last year of Early College, so that makes me a “super senior,” or a student who is in their fifth and final year of the program. I don’t regret my decision to attend my school. I’m actually thankful that I got a chance to experience what it would be like to start college at the age of 14. If this sounds like something you’d be interested in too, read on to learn about another option after middle school besides traditional high school.

Classes

Classroom

Photo by Clennie Wilkins, Academic Success Coordinator

Like any other high school, Early College students are required to take traditional English, math, science, and social studies classes to graduate with a high school diploma. But we also take college courses, on campus and online, from instructors at Vance-Granville Community College campuses. The Vance Granville Franklin Campus is across the road from the high school, so it’s just a quick walk between classes. Sometimes you may miss part of your high school classes to attend a college course—around 10 to 30 minutes at the most. To get your Associate of Science degree, you have to earn 61 credits, while 60 credits are required to earn an Associate of Art. The courses are challenging, but they help you toward your goals.

Extracurricular activities

Prom

Photo by Erica Shoulder-Royster, Principal

Early College students are given opportunities just like students at traditional high schools. We can join clubs, go to school dances, play sports, etc. Although it may seem as if students at Early College work more than play, work and fun equal out. One of the amazing events hosted by the Franklin County Early College is its Spring Formal. It was an amazing night filled with fun moments and seeing old friends.

Is Early College right for you?

Graduate

Photo by Erica Shoulder-Royster, Principal

Early College is a big step in a student’s life. Five years is a long time, and you’ll be in school for an additional year after senior year, so taking your time to think about whether you should apply is very important. The principal and a group of students visited my middle school to talk to the eighth graders about Early College; that’s how I learned about the program.

Before applying, there are some things you need to keep in mind. Students should think about whether they are truly ready to dedicate a lot of time and effort to the school and are mature enough to take on challenging college courses. You’ll have late nights and heavy course loads, and you may need to give up sports or other activities to keep up with your academics.

Early College gives students the opportunity to experience high school and college at the same time. You’ll take classes that other students have to wait until their first year of college to take. Even if it does sound like a lot of work, it’s worth it in the end to graduate with a high school diploma and an Associate of Art or Science. 

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About Brinea Wright

I was born and raised in North Carolina. I go to high school in a program called Early College. I have taken high school as well as college courses since freshmen year. I wanted to be a veterinarian at the age of four until my senior year of Early College. Now that I'm in my last year, as a super senior, I want to major in English (Professional Writing, to be more specific).