How to Appeal Your College Financial Aid Package

If your financial aid package isn't what you expected, don't panic. These eight tips will help you make a case and appeal for more aid money from your school.

Congratulations! You were accepted to one of your top-choice colleges—only you’re not celebrating quite so hard, because a meager financial aid package has you feeling less than triumphant. If your financial aid package isn't up to snuff, don't panic. It is possible to appeal your financial aid award to get more assistance. Reports on the rate of success of financial aid appeals vary. A survey from the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators and the College Board found that 5% of public colleges and 10% of private colleges adjusted financial aid in response to a family's stated inability to pay. Meanwhile, only 1% of public colleges and 2% of private colleges frequently or always adjust financial aid packages to reflect other colleges’ offers. Though financial aid appeals have limited success, you have nothing to lose; a college will not rescind your acceptance because you asked for more money. Here are eight tips for appealing for more college financial aid.

Check whether the college has an appeal procedure

The first step to appealing a financial aid award is to find out if the college in question has a procedure for appealing aid packages. It may require certain paperwork, have deadlines you need to follow, or other particular requirements And if you don't abide by these rules, you risk losing even the chance to be reconsidered. Some colleges may provide this information on their website, but it may not be in an easy-to-find place. Make sure to do some real digging to find the information you need. If they don't have it anywhere on their website, call the financial aid office.

Research the college’s financial aid policies and trends

All schools approach financial aid differently. For example, if a college doesn't offer merit awards in the first place, don't bother asking for one. (The vast majority of schools do give merit awards, but some highly selective colleges, including the Ivies, don't.) Other helpful information for deciding whether to appeal your financial aid and for how much are the average award amounts the college distributed in years past. You can find this data on the CollegeXpress school profile pages or on websites like CollegeData.com or College Board.

Related: 5 Things to Research Again Before Choosing a College

Find out your school-specific expected family contribution (EFC)

This is the dollar amount you are expected to pay for college. Your EFC may vary between schools, which sometimes calculate them differently. Many colleges use the results of the FAFSA’s Federal Methodology to determine your EFC, but some schools also use an Institutional Methodology EFC as determined by the CSS Profile. In any case, you should know your EFC results before appealing any financial aid award. For example, if your EFC is $40,000, tuition is $50,000, and the school gave you $10,000 in financial aid, then they’ve been fairly reasonable and probably won’t budge in their financial aid package—unless you can come up with a reason the EFC is wrong.

Focus on special circumstances affecting your EFC

This is extremely important: many schools won't alter your aid package unless there was a unavoidable change in financial circumstances, such as a parent losing a job or receiving a pay cut, medical bills for an elderly grandparent or special needs child, a natural disaster, etc. This type of information might not have been taken into consideration on the FAFSA, but financial aid officers are willing to do so. Appeals based on special circumstances may be referred to as a "Professional Judgment Review” or "Special Circumstances Review.” Keep in mind that you must be able to provide documentation. Also keep in mind that schools don’t care about difficulty affording college based on discretionary spending, e.g., high mortgage costs, car payments, and so on.

Related: Important Things to Know About Your EFC

Leverage competing offers

Some schools will revamp your financial aid package if you received a better offer from a similar or more high profile college. If your school is willing to do this, share in writing the competing offer (or offers) you received. If the college wants you badly enough, they'll attempt to match—or maybe even exceed—the other school’s financial aid offer. A handful of top schools, like Carnegie Mellon University and Cornell University, widely advertise the fact that they do everything in their power to match competing offers. This will be especially true if you have proven demonstrated in a particular college.

Ask for a change to your cost of attendance

The financial aid office can alter your cost of attendance (COA) (aka the cumulative average annual cost of attending a given college, including tuition, room, board, and other expenses) if you have special expenses outside the norm. For example, perhaps you need more money to accommodate a disability or your specific major requires you to purchase special equipment. Make sure you consider all elements of your particular circumstances academically and personally so you’re not missing anything that could benefit your case.

Related: 6 Ways to Reduce the Cost of College

Take emotion out of the equation

Remember that schools are businesses, and they have a set budget they need to stick to. You have to present a compelling, logical case for why you deserve more money than they initially thought. Financial aid officers will likely be immune to sob stories, threats, or bragging—they've heard it all before. Instead, focus on being as specific as possible about how much you need and why need you it, and provide documentation backing up your claim.

Try again next year

If you’re denied an appeal your freshman year, consider appealing for more financial aid the following year, especially if your family’s financial situation changes. It may seem daunting to still attend that school without a better aid package, but if you intend to do so no matter one, it doesn’t have to be the end of the line. In fact, if your financial circumstances change in the middle of a semester, there’s a chance that the school could reassess your need for that year.

Related: Get More Money by Appealing Your Financial Aid Award

Financial aid is one of the tougher aspects of the college search and admission process. And while it certainly depends on the school, even having the slightest chance of increasing your financial aid package makes it worth trying. Increase your chances even more by following the suggestions above. You’ll have your best chance by being smart and practical about the situation.  

Tired of reading articles? Continue getting great college advice by watching some videos over on the CollegeXpress YouTube channel!

Like what you’re reading?

Join the CollegeXpress community! Create a free account and we’ll notify you about new articles, scholarship deadlines, and more.

Join Now

Join our community of
over 5 million students!

CollegeXpress has everything you need to simplify your college search, get connected to schools, and find your perfect fit.

Join CollegeXpress
Rose Kearsley

Rose Kearsley

High School Class of 2021

CollegeXpress has seriously helped me out a lot, especially when it comes to scholarships and studying for tests like the ACT. I also really love the financial help. It’s a little harder to pay because I live with a family of eight, so any help is appreciated. Thanks for this opportunity!

Jenna

Jenna

High School Class of 2021

CollegeXpress has helped me greatly during my college search. I used their college search feature often and it helped in comparing schools I was looking at. Now that I’ve found a college the scholarship search feature is helping me find a way to find my college experience. CollegeXpress has many helpful features and resources for anyones college search, it truly is a wonderful tool for anyone entering college level!

Maya Ingraham

Maya Ingraham

October 2021 Mini Scholarship Winner, Class of 2022

CollegeXpress has given me more confidence in my college process. With easy-to-access resources and guidance such as the CX Weekly Roundup, I have been able to find the best colleges for me. Most importantly, there’s a surplus of scholarship opportunities for every student to support their education.

Kyla McClain

Kyla McClain

High School Class of 2024

I found CollegeXpress when you partnered with Bold.org for a scholarship. I found your website, put my information in, and got connected. I only wanted to stay in North Carolina [for college] and not move far from home, but you all opened a door up for me. I started researching colleges you suggested for me. On your social media platforms, you also give really good test-taking tips that I used and suggested others to do the same. It helped me a lot on my exams, so thank you.

Amari Toussaint

Amari Toussaint

High School Class of 2022

CollegeXpress helped me narrow my school choices down from 10 schools to four and then two. It also gave me information on a school I had never heard about or thought about attending until now, which is the school I will be attending in the fall. I am thankful for CollegeXpress and its helpful tools.

College Matches
X

Colleges You May Be Interested In

Randolph College

Lynchburg, VA

Moody Bible Institute

Chicago, IL

Dean College

Franklin, MA

North Park University

Chicago, IL